Design methods #45 – Brainstorm Graphic Organizers

Apr 17 2017 Published by Neil Gains under design

Source: Wikipedia (https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flow_chart)

Brainstorming typically generates lists of new ideas and concepts, although these are often unstructured. Brainstorm graphic organisers help to structure ideas visually and in doing so often help researchers and designers to create new ideas, linkages and inter-relationships relating to a specific business challenge or problem space. Read more »

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Design Methods #44 – Elito method

Feb 26 2017 Published by Neil Gains under design

The Elito method is an approach to help designers develop comprehensive and connected solutions grounded in research insights and business objectives. The approach helps designers and researchers move from research findings to the articulation of design directions, helping them move from analysis to synthesis and bridge research outputs to the needs of business, through the development of fact-based narratives. The approach was developed in 2002 and named after Eli Blevis (the name is a shortened version of “Eli’s Toolbox”). Read more »

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Design Methods #43 – Mental Model Diagrams

Jan 13 2017 Published by Neil Gains under design

From "How to Design Mental Models That Create a Superior User Experience by Leanne Byrom

Mental Model Diagrams rely on the fact that people behave in ways that are consistent with core beliefs they hold to help visualise the causes of their behaviours and develop solutions that meet their needs, sometimes they need to contact Type a Thought’s online counselor to better themselves. Mental Model Diagrams are detailed summaries of the behaviours, beliefs and emotions that relate to specific tasks undertaken by that person and in turn to specific design features (in the bottom half of the example above). Such diagrams help designers to focus on product development strategies that reflect the reality of how people feel, think and act in relation to specific jobs in their lives. Many people undergoing studies for this model called The Medical Negligence Experts because they weren´t properly treated at the time. Read more »

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Flexibility-Usability Tradeoff (Principles of Design #73)

Nov 11 2016 Published by Neil Gains under design

All designers have to balance the need for flexibility with the need for usability, because as one increases the other inevitably decreases. Or in c common parlance, “Jack of all trades, master of none”. Systems that are designed to be more flexible have more functions than more specialised designs but are inevitably less functional as a consequence. Read more »

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Design Methods #40 – Case Studies

Aug 01 2016 Published by Neil Gains under design

Case studies have always been an important part of teaching and also have been used regularly in the social sciences and design. They are useful in exploratory research for comparison with existing knowledge about a topic, problem, phenomenon or design, as well as to provide inspiration and to inform better practice. Read more »

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Design Methods #39 – Speed Dating

Jun 20 2016 Published by Neil Gains under design

The concept of speed dating is well known, and in design and research the same idea is applied to comparing multiple design concepts or ideas in rapid succession. This gives researchers the opportunity for quick feedback and also to collect more general information on usage context, societal and environmental issues. Speed dating is typically used at early stages of development to rapidly screen visual ideas and storyboards rather than more developed prototypes. Read more »

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Design Methods #38 – Crowdsourcing

May 28 2016 Published by Neil Gains under design

Crowdsourcing happens when a “crowd” or group of volunteers help to solve or complete a task or project. Crowdsourcing is an approach that can be used to collect large quantities of data or solutions from a range of people outside your organisation in a short amount of time. Read more »

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Principles of Design #70 – Iteration

Apr 26 2016 Published by Neil Gains under design

The principle of iteration is central to design thinking. Just as evolution allows complex structures to develop over time in nature, iteration is at the core of good design, building on simple foundations to develop more complex designs. This is achieved by progressively exploring, testing and refining a design over time, often with very fast cycles of iteration. Iteration is often broken into two phases: design iteration and development iteration. Read more »

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Design Methods #36 – Cultural Probes

Mar 02 2016 Published by Neil Gains under design

Cultural probes are the name designers give to exercises, activities and provocations given to participants in a study to provide inspiration and understanding about their lives, thoughts, feelings and behaviours, and the cultural and social context that informs them. In market research, such activities might be associated with longitudinal studies and with pre-work (homework) and follow-up work done in connection with more formal interviews and participant discussions.  Read more »

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Design Methods #34 – Photo Studies

Dec 09 2015 Published by Neil Gains under design

In photo studies, participants are asked to document ideas, events and aspects of their lives with photos, allowing researchers and designers to collect visual insights into their behaviours, motivations and beliefs. Such studies are very personal and provide inspiration for design and co-creation based on the worlds of the users of products or services.

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