Personas (Design methods #47)

Nov 02 2017 Published by Neil Gains under design

Personas (sometimes called pen portraits) are used in design and research to represent customer or user types through fictional characters, often based on synthesising research findings (e.g.., segmentation studies) but with a fully fleshed out version of an archetype or archetypes that creates a more realistic picture of an individual person with an individual history, beliefs, context, character and behaviours. In some respects, they are archetypes brought fully to life with real details and specific context.

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Attractiveness Bias (Principles of Design #75)

Aug 04 2017 Published by Neil Gains under design

People tend to see attractive people as more intelligent, competent, mortal and sociable than less attractive people. Thus, attractive people are seen more positively, receive more attention from the opposite sex, receive more affection from their mothers and receive more leniency from judges and juries. When everything else is equivalent, attractive people are more likely to be preferred in hiring and will earn more money in the same job. Most importantly, they tend to get more votes in elections. Read more »

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Building Muslim brands

May 30 2017 Published by Neil Gains under book review

After a recent presentation on Understanding Muslim Beauty, I was browsing in a Bangkok bookshop and came across the book Islamic Branding and Marketing by Paul Temporal. This book would certainly have saved me some time in putting together my presentation, drawing on many of the resources I had used (sometimes too heavily perhaps). Read more »

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Figure-Ground Relationship (Principles of Design #74)

May 29 2017 Published by Neil Gains under design

Photo by Toby Harriman (source: http://www.ipoxstudios.com/figure-ground-relationship-proper-use-will-define-your-subject/)

Figure-ground relationship is the design principle that any element is perceived either as an object of focus (figure) or as something else (ground). This is one of the Gestalt principles of perception, where perception focuses on a central element and others become undifferentiated in the background. This is true of other senses as well as vision (e.g., when you hear your name in a crowded party your focus switches from your current conversation to listening to another). Read more »

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Don’t Let Short Term Thinking Kill Creativity

Oct 30 2016 Published by Neil Gains under creativity

In their most recent report on advertising creativity and effectiveness, the IPA and author Peter Field reach the startling conclusion that both creativity and effectiveness are under threat. And who are the culprits? They believe that short-term thinking and especially a focus on driving rapid sales effects, combined with the post-global financial crisis recession, are killing the creativity of advertising. Read more »

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On Thinking and Not Thinking

Sep 30 2016 Published by Neil Gains under book review

Proclaimed as “The All New” Don’t Think of an Elephant, George Lakoff’s classic book has been substantially rewritten and updated to reflect contemporary issues in political debate and recent electoral history. The original book was a must read for anyone interested in behavioural science, communication (or politics) and the important lessons from the first book remain, updated and expanded in this even better and more valuable book. Read more »

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Principles of Design #72 – Readability

Sep 25 2016 Published by Neil Gains under design

Readability is the degree to which prose can be understood, determined by word length, word commonality, sentence length, number of clauses in a sentence and the number of syllables in the sentence. It is something that is often overlooked by designers and researchers, who often believe that more complex information requires complex presentation. This, of course, is bunkum. The principle of cognitive fluency teaches us that the easier something is to read the more readily it will be understood and the more likely it will be acted on. I write this as I am preparing for a client workshop on report writing where the number 1 principle is make everything as simple as possible (but no simpler as Einstein famously said). Read more »

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Design Methods #41 – Exploratory Research

Sep 16 2016 Published by Neil Gains under design

Exploratory research covers a wide variety of approaches used in the first stages of a research program where territory is unfamiliar. Exploratory research is often used to plan, scope and define later research stages, by understanding the key issues, dynamics, beliefs and behaviours relating to a particular topic as well as the context of the topic and business challenge. It is usually immersive for the researcher or designer, helping them build understanding and empathy with the user and the context of the design challenge.

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The Rhyme and Rhythm of Branding: Using Sound to Build Sense, Symbol and Story into your Brand

Aug 08 2016 Published by Neil Gains under sensory branding

Sound is often the most neglected of the senses when it comes to branding, although it is only second to the visual senses in terms of its importance and has a very specific role that helps the brain to create stories from cause and effect.

There is more to using sound in branding than music and song, important as they are. Of course, music and song are particularly powerful in creating links to specific emotions. However, in the esSenseĀ® framework outlined in Brand esSense, other aspects of sound can also contribute to building a brand through the senses, symbols and stories, using the best instruments is one of the main keys, by checking The Box Tiger Music you will find the best ones.

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Design Methods #39 – Speed Dating

Jun 20 2016 Published by Neil Gains under design

The concept of speed dating is well known, and in design and research the same idea is applied to comparing multiple design concepts or ideas in rapid succession. This gives researchers the opportunity for quick feedback and also to collect more general information on usage context, societal and environmental issues. Speed dating is typically used at early stages of development to rapidly screen visual ideas and storyboards rather than more developed prototypes. Read more »

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